COTE DE TEXAS: YOUR OWN FIXER UPPER?!!

YOUR OWN FIXER UPPER?!!

 

Now that we are empty nesters, Mr. Slippersocksman and I have been toying with the idea of selling our house and downsizing.  After a lifetime of accumulating, I am wanting to sell, edit, and purge.   Or, maybe it’s just that I want to clean it all up and start fresh?

Although Ben & I say we want to move, after we start that BIG discussion, we each get very quiet, immersed in our own thoughts, dreading the Herculean task ahead.    Then, we say in unison – “maybe next year!!!”

How DO you face the ordeal of packing up 25 years worth of…. junk?  Just the thought of emptying out the attic is terrifying enough! 

And then there’s “Fixer Upper.”  Each week we watch that hit HGTV show and say  – “We could live there and be very, very happy.”  But who really wants to move to Waco?

Whenever the talk is about moving, I head for the real estate listings to see what is out there for us to move into.  And then I get REALLY depressed and think maybe we should just stay put!! 

It was during one of those times that I spied this little Fixer Upper gem – and thought you would enjoy seeing it too! 

If you are looking for a Fixer Upper that is already fixed up – I have found it for you…

and if you are looking for a cottage in Galveston, I have found that too.

Look no further – your dreams have been answered.

The price is $270,000 – and, the furniture is INCLUDED for $270,000.  It’s a steal!

 

The house was built in 1913, which means it has survived a handful of terrible hurricanes and it still stands!   This is what I love about the old houses in Galveston.  The new ones blow away, but the old ones are here for eternity!!

 

All new plumbing, electrical, HVAC, and roof!   Two bedrooms, two baths.  1500 sq. ft.  $270,000.

The only drawback?  No garage.

But hey, there’s a wonderful front porch where you can sit outside all day and night and keep a close eye on your car!!

 

 

Look how cute the front door and transom is!

 

Original shiplap – thank you Joanna!   The front central hall divides the house in two.  On the right side are the two bedrooms, the living areas are on the left.

 

The living room with the front bay window and shiplap walls.   I assume those antique-looking settees are included too.  It says – furniture included!   So cute!!!

 

The living room opens to the dining room and kitchen – one large area.

 

The kitchen/dining room is the focal point of the house – it’s fabulous with its subway tile walls!!!

 

The view from the dining room back into the living room.

 

 

Behind the kitchen is the laundry room.

 

The  refrigerator is inset in the wall to give it a built in look.

 

Waterfall counter.  Notice the brick detail.

 

The back wall and backsplash is ceiling to floor subway tile!  Wood hood, open shelving, and sconces.   Soooo well done!!!

 

Farm sink too!!!   The cabinets are black and the counters are white – great contrast.

 

The bedrooms are across the center hall.

 

 

The master bedroom is darling in black and white.  Love the chest and rug!

 

The master bedroom has a double sink and a walk in shower.  Notice the transom window.  Black and white with wood accents.

 

The second bathroom has a vintage tub.

 

Accent brick wall and glass sconces in bath #2.

 

The back yard is fully fenced.

 

The back yard is so large for this sized house!!!!  Look how cute!!!   The  tree blocks the view of the door – but the laundry room/kitchen opens to the back yard. 

 

The back yard has a pergola which is great to enjoy the ocean breezes!

 

At night – it’s lit up.  All you need is a fire pit.

 

OK – someone out there needs this house!  What a great vacation house or empty nest house!! 

Hurry, this one won’t last, I promise you.

HAR listing HERE.

 

And while we are talking about beach houses, the new Coastal Living Magazine had a beautiful house that really made me stop to take a second look, something that doesn’t seem to happen all that much these days.

Designed by Jenny Keenan and Beau Clowney Architect on Sullivan’s Island off Charleston, the house is not a vacation place.   Instead, the owners have been living a chic NYC life for the past 20 years and they have moved to the beach, permanently.  How nice!!  So their house is more than just a summer pastel place.  Instead, it has an English Manor look mixed in with lots of antiques and layers of details.  It reminds me of summer houses that Southern Accents used to showcase a decade ago.  I just wish the photos were bigger and clearer.  Even scanning – all the screen shots look blurry for some reason.  I went searching on Instagram and Facebook for more – and I found a few behind the scene shots from the photoshoot.

 

The photographer @jsavagegibson is caught in action.  I LOVE the center stairs with the single garage on each side.  That’s a great way to break up a front loading garage.

 

Here is the entry – with an antique painted and gilt console mixed with porcelains and a mirror.  The floors in the front area are painted.  Past the entry is the dining room with wicker host chairs and de Gournay murals on the walls.

 

 

 From Instagram, above the entry console is this mirror which reflects the swimming  pool.

 

The view past the dining room/entry leads into the living area with the center skirted table.

 

From Instagram -  the dining room with its mix of chairs.

 

A center table skirted.  Fabulous! 

 

The living area – much dressier than a typical beach house.  I just wish there were more photos!!!!!  Loving blue and white ikat these days and loving masses of blue and white porcelains, everywhere.  Quadrille Ikat.

 

 

From Instagram, the stairs to the first level have a runner that is actually painted on.

 

The guest room on the first floor.  Can I move in, please?  Jasper fabric.  Another thing I am loving these days – round textured rugs like this.  LOVE!

 

Another guest room.  Persepolis wallcovering by Quadrille Fabrics.

 

To Shop This Look of this House - Click on photos.

And I need a favor for a friend.  Monsieur Robert Smith, the antiquarian from Breaux Bridge, Louisiana, is now in France, at his summer place.  His house is in the town of Uzes, in the southern region of the country.  It’s a very old town and recently they discovered just how old it really is!  During an evacuation, a mosaic floor from the year 50 BC was discovered, just two blocks from M. Smith’s house!!

Apparently it is a 1/2 acre site that dates from 50 BC to the 7th century and another section is from the Middle Ages.   The discovery is believed to be the lost Roman city of Ucetia, over 2000 years old.   It’s incredibly beautiful and I urge you to read this article about the site HERE.

The discovery includes a bakery and a house with large, earthenware dolia vases – which held alcoholic beverages!

Below are the two mosaic tiled floors discovered.   Amazing!!

 

The problem is the city wants to build a dormitory over this historical site!  They want to move the mosaics and the walls to another site, which is just pure insanity.  There is now a petition to stop the moving of the site.  M. Smith is asking that if you are a lover of antiquities, to please sign the petition to keep the site intact.  To sign the petition, go HERE.

A huge thank you from M. Smith and me both!!!

53 comments :

  1. The mosaic tile floors of the Ancient Roman house in Usez are stunning! Fingers crossed Robert Smith and his supporters are able to persuade the city authorities to leave all this in situ and protect it from weather etc as well! They already have some remarkable buildings in the town and seem to be doing a good job of preserving those. best wishes, Pamela

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    1. Ooops! Should be Uzes! Sorry! Pamela

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  2. I'm sure your own house is much nicer than the first one shown here. The shiplap craze has come and gone, and that whole bleached out, faux industrial je ne sais quoi style is on its way out, I am so pleased to say. If you want real design, HGTV is not the place to look. So hang on to what you have got until something a little less formulaic comes along. You'll know it when you see it. There was a whole conversation on another forum about this very subject. The Fixer Upper craze is waning, and the people of Waco fell out of love with the Gaineses. The second house you show is infinitely superior, and its style will endure. Very classic and wonderful use of colour. It will never be dated like the first one.

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    1. where were they talking about Fixer Upper? I want to read what they said.

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    2. If people had a mind of their own and could formulate their own thoughts they wouldn't need to wait for the next décor trend to come along.
      Sheila

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    3. Sheila -- my sentiments, exactly!! You are right on!!

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    4. Completely agree..do your own thing!

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    5. I agree 100% Cynthia Lambert! The fixer upper craze is so trendy, I stay far from it. Every store is filled with items to resemble that style, and it's so "follow the crowd". No personal style what so ever. Only...."oh, joanna likes this, then I do too". I was antique shopping in Waco, and met with many dealers, who do not like working with Joanna, and said she's quite snobbish. Also I've been to her store, which was over priced "decor steals" fake antiques made in massive production in china. It's sad to see people follow instead of making their home from their heart. :)

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  3. after 25 years in Atlanta we moved my house was so full of stuff all the years of collecting and intending to do whatever. you have to do it in stages and be hard on yourself..I had so many books that was the difficult part so I would go through them then stop it took at least 4 different culls..so now we live in a smaller house out West and to be honest I sometimes think of some of the things but I don't miss them at all. with your talent you can make a delightful home anywhere I say a new beginning will be great for you two

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  4. I also vote that you downsize and purge and start over. You often write that something in a house you are featuring is what you would like to have yourself. You could design and create beautiful rooms... so why not?

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    1. Because I'm scared of the task of moving! physically!!! omg. it scares me so much.

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    2. You might be surprised to find how good it feels to tidy up and sort everything. I went through all my stuff before a big move 2 1/2 years ago, and while I did keep alot of old children's things, everything is organized and labelled in bins. I am a woodworker and I had to move all my tools including a tablesaw, etc.

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  5. Loved both houses, but I thought the first one was especially cute. And why would anyone say that the shiplap craze has come and gone? Shiplap is a classic material, and in this case it was original to the home which was built over 100 years ago. It's enduring, clean, and beautiful. It's especially lovely in a beach or rural setting. Great post. Can't wait to see what you downsize to; not an easy task.

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    1. When the shiplap is original to the house, it's fine. When it's some boards someone has nailed on just to look trendy, it's not always, if ever, a good thing.
      Sheila

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  6. I signed the petition. Anything for historic preservation and you, Joni!

    I'm all for downsizing - and my kids haven't even left yet!

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  7. I long to downsize and start over. We have been looking at model homes with square footage of about 2000. While they have been decorated nicely there just isn't enough detail and history that makes it interesting for me to live in if that makes sense. So, my husband and I are purging daily. It does seem to help getting rid of the clutter and keeping what we really love.

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    1. My garage! it is filled with junk!!!!!

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    2. Be aware when looking at model homes, a lot of them are staged with smaller scaled furniture to make you think they are larger when in reality, they won't hold most of what you have.

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    3. Joni, we spent most of Easter cleaning out our double garage. A vile job as there was so much stuff there it barely fitted the cars and we couldn't access it properly to keep well cleaned. Dust, dead leaves, spiders, moths, the lot. We paid a man to take away most of the stuff but also put things out on our nature strip in front of the house. A huge bbq (still in good condition and working order)from the days when our family lived at home, a coffee table etc. They quickly found new owners.
      A dreadful job but now we feel so good about it. Still have to go through the old trunks and tea-chests and sort those. Can't even remember what's in them but we suspect much of it is old toys and "artworks" from primary school, etc. Probably books too. Some of it will be Op Shop material. But that's a job for another day. We've had enough garage cleansing for now. Good luck with yours. You might have more real treasures than we found. Best wishes, Pamela

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    4. Anon 7:45 PM
      Scintillating.
      Sheila

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  8. The Galveston house is too small for year round, you need storage space and a garage.
    Suggest you rent a few months in a smaller home to try it out
    Another alternative is remodel existing home for retiring in place
    If your master is upstairs consider a master on main is the trends we're seeing up north

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  9. I moved from my forever home of 30 years from Northern California to Southern California. It was very, very stressful, but I am glad I did it. Then 10 years later, I moved again. I have a lovely home by the beach now and close to my grandchildren. No regrets.
    Judith

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  10. Speaking of Fixer Upper, I'm surprised that someone hasn't come out of the woodwork and yelled "child labor"! Just sayin'....

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  11. The Galveston kitchen has VERY little storage and the range hood would look better in stainless steel. When I turned 70, I started downsizing and it feels marvelous!! I'm planning ahead for The Day and I didn't want to leave my kids with tons of stuff to pick through. I'm now in my minimalist industrial chic phase and loving it. I don't care what is trending; I care how I feel in my own creative environment! And if I change my mind, it will be because I want to, not because of a trend!!

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    1. I agree the Galveston house had zero storage, this is more of a vacation cottage rental. It's sold now anyway it will probably be on VRBO and airNB

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    2. it sold!?!?!!? wow. that was quick!!! no storage. it's def for vacation - there is an attic. but still. it's a second home or you have to use the second bedroom as a closet.

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  12. With all the inventory you say you have, why not do some home staging? Joni, Home Stager Extraordinaire!!

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    1. Joni you could probably sell most of your goodies online do a tag sale on your blog

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    2. OMG, yes please!!

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    3. that's what my mom said - have a sale. Yall - i have so many really nice accessories in drawers and closets!!! it's a crime!!! I just need someone to organize me and help me. my helper got sick - he's got diabetes, and since then, I'm hopeless!!!!

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    4. Hire an estate sale company they do all the heavy lifting for a cut on the sales.

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  13. What a fun adventure! Excited to follow along and see what you decide to do!
    Courtney @French Country Cottage

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  14. Another thing about moving downsizing, do a lot of research where you want to live and what are the priorities ie
    Cost of living, climate, tax burden and proximity to services. Did a casual look on Zillow in West U and the property taxes are terribly high for empty nesters and retirees. It's one of my trigger points of an area to avoid as a retiree. You want an easy to maintain lifestyle so you can do what you want given your assets.

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    1. yep, the taxes are a killer. that's what is scaring us.

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  15. Love Sullivan's Island. This house is probably $3M it's one of the most expensive areas to live in Charleston.

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  16. we moved to another city after about 45 years of marriage. I love all things decor, and always had a spare large closet as well as a basement to house all my goodies. Before the move we held an estate sale, and it gave me great pleasure to see my things being carried away, to be enjoyed by another family. I had held on to quite a bit from both of our parents' houses, then one day I thought, my mother would have gotten rid of this and redecorated by now if she were still alive. That thought helped me to let go. Move on I say!! Do it while you can and while you can enjoy it. I love your blog and wish you the best whatever you decide.

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  17. In a life of frequent moves, sometimes from country to country, I don't feel the need to move again now we're older. When we bought our current family house years ago we thought of the time when we would be older. So it's one level, has few steps to enter and not too big to look after. Though with reasonable storage space. Many of our friends have downsized to apartments or townhouses but our son and his wife and family live in another city. So when they come to visit we still need two spare bedrooms for them, as well as our study.
    We are gradually decluttering things from our former lives (including many books and dinner services) - giving to family or others or to Op Shops. But we're happy to stay in the community where we've lived for the last 20 years and don't feel the need to start all over again, breaking in new supermarkets, shops, doctors, dentists, neighbours etc. Perhaps I wouldn't have furnished exactly as we did 20 years ago, but that's OK we're changing a few things, and I can live comfortably with the rest. Best wishes with whatever you decide to do. Pamela

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  18. If you don't buy that lovely house Joni I will emigrate from Canada to buy it. It is fabulous. Homes here in Southern Ontario are out of control. A home here like that would be closer to a million.

    Barb

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  19. So, if left in place...what will become of the uncovered mosaic floors? How will they be preserved and truly appreciated? Why would it be so horrible to move them to a museum? Pamela mentions that more preservation has taken place in the town. I'll read the article.

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  20. Another vote for downsizing! But only because i'm selfish and would love to buy your house next year. West U is our dream location. My in-laws and grandmother all live on Drake and we would love to be close. Our ranch in Afton Oaks is getting a little small for two kids, eek!

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  21. First, I would be beyond shocked if the French historical preservation authorities don't save those mosaics, in situ (probably) or in a museum. They didn't let us change a single tile in our 400-year-old apartments; these are far more rare. Uzès is a magnificent town, full of historical wonders (though I could say that about any town around here).
    I recently had to help empty my parents' house; first slowly, with them when they moved (rather unwillingly) from their stair-filled home to an assisted living apartment. In just over a year, my dad died (cancer and diabetes) and my mom died three weeks later, very unexpectedly. That put the house-cleaning on a new schedule. I took care of the apartment, because my brothers were going through enough, and let me tell you it was traumatic. I also went through the house, but because I live far away, that burden was mostly on my brothers, who live in the same town. I swear I will never let the same thing befall my kid. Every year, we round up unneeded stuff to sell or donate, and for some time, I just say no to new acquisitions. So I think your downsizing move is a good idea. Keeping stuff just to have it? Why?
    Our house is small by U.S. standards, though in the average for France: 1100 square feet. It feels big, though, because it's so open. If each space--living, dining, kitchen, den--had four walls and a door to enter they would be tiny, cramped rooms. Because they are open, people always comment that our house is so big. But it isn't.
    Re the Galveston house: it's adorable. Almost my taste, but not quite formal enough for me. I wouldn't put up shiplap, but if it was original to the house, I wouldn't take it down. It seems to have a smart layout.

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    1. "From what I can read" you should be evaluated by a physician.
      Sheila

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  23. We didn't downsize (husband only wanted less land) but moved after 34 years. It was an ongoing project for almost a year. Got rid of a lot but after 9 years, more could be gotten rid of....it ain't easy! Love Galveston and those old houses!!

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  24. After 28 years we moved. It was not easy. Give yourself plenty of time and start by going closet by closet Throw out, give away, put big pieces on the street with a "free" sign on it, sell. Make the effort to stage your house and that will force you to declutter and get rid of lots of stuff. I found that doing my husband's office, workshop and the garage by myself allowed me to throw out so much of his junk. To this day he has no idea how much I got rid of, and he doesn't know what he's missing.

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  25. What a charming and beautifully decorated cottage! Thanks for sharing the pics. I didn't like the brass faucet in the kitchen sink though. It didn't match the overall feel of the house. Looks like Joanna Gaines has some competition out there. Whoever decorated it knows their stuff!

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  26. The house did sell. I live a block down the street, in a home built in 1894. We don't have many closets either, when the homes were built closets were considered rooms and taxed. We live in our little cottage full time. We moved from Lakeway nearly three years ago. We purged a lot to fit in to our cottage, you adapt. That's what armoires are for, and skirted tables, right? Those of you dreaming of Galveston, Y'all come on down, the water's fine.

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